The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (2013)


L: 9/10

M: 8.5/10


Analysis from an only child with a boring origin story:

This book had a lot of hype going into it: bestseller lists, a movie in the works, and a shiny gold Pulitzer prize sticker affixed on the front of a mysterious cover. Not sure if I’ve ever read a Pulitzer Prize-winning book before, also I’m not sure I just used a colon correctly. One thing I can say for certainty is, the characters in this book stuck with me and gave me feelings seldom felt through literature. I have yet to fully move away from this book, it lives with me still. Donna Tartt’s writing style is very descriptive, painting pictures as rich as the stolen pieces of art that propel the plot. A less than concrete ending left me a little miffed at first, but some time away has made me appreciate an incomplete and open style conclusion. These characters have a lot of life left, both in their fictional universe and my imagination.

Analysis from an over observant instigator:

I can’t escape this book. It lives with me. I share my memories. I speak the language. Looking back, there is no part of this book that should have such a strong impact on me, but it lingers. I have to give complete credit to Donna Tartt in creating a book in which I felt so involved. The characters were given such impactful descriptions that you found yourself casually wondering what they were up to as you drank your morning coffee. It is by no means an easy or quick read, but putting it down between chapters is almost necessary to process the information given. Perhaps it is just that the author speaks my language and pulled me into a story that could have easily been told within a few pages that creates such a bond with this book. It could be the ways I felt compatible with the characters or the common bonds we shared. Regardless of the reason, I have only good to say about the book. I usually am quite jaded on the way a story ends and can be quite critical, but found the ending to be perfectly in keeping with the tone of the book and I want more. Give me more, Donna. Complete me.


Donna Tartt.jpg
Donna Tartt

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